Wednesday, July 10, 2013

And that is why we are here......

After having been slightly let down by the first few episodes of Arrested Development, Amy and I were in the "market" for a new show. Since we've always been interested in midwifery, particularly during the 1950's in England, we thought Call the Midwife would be a perfect fit. Obviously I joke, but I was in fact the one who questioned why there were no male duolas (I called them dude-las) in the field while going through our first birthing classes. Strangely enough the question wasn't taken too seriously. 

We're only one episode into the series, but I was impressed from the start. It depicted a privileged and unsuspecting midwife graduate taking her first job in a rough section of England. And to her surprise, and dismay, she gets saddled with a bunch of nuns. Nothing against nuns, of course. The main character is blown away by the rough conditions in the apartments, particularly after one of her patients has a huge syphyllus sore that she just "hadn't gotten around" to checking out. 

She opens up to one of the "veteran" nuns, "I can't believe people live like this."

The nun immediately responds, "But they do live like this. And that is why we are here."

What a beautiful scene! What is a local church to do with the sin, shame, and at times syphyllus in its surroundings? Should we be surprised? Should we bring more shame upon shame by distant judgments and telling people to simply change? Should we vacate the area and head for "higher" ground? 

Since we are all sinners, we certainly have common ground with non-Christians. Lots of it. I sure do. And my theology reminds me that I shouldn't be surprised at any condition people live in; should I expect people who have not tasted the gospel to live as though they have tasted grace (regularly repenting from sin/self righteousness and resting in Christ's performance for and approval of me)?

Now "living like this" may look like gross personal sin: syphyllus and shancre sores. Or it may look like poverty, crime, disease, and other affects compounded by personal and communal sin. Or it may look like good old-fashioned self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, and idolatry. Regardless, people everywhere, all over, "do live like that" and are in great need of the gospel (as are Christians too by the way-so we have that in common as well!).
Instead of running from them, a church and its people have an opportunity to run toward them. Shouldn't we say, "That is why we are here?" That is why our church plant is here. "Living like this" is a result of disbelieving the gospel, and doesn't that give us and others hope? Our answer to the surrounding world isn't "live like us" or "live like Jesus" but turn and rest in Jesus. I suspect that many people who have rejected Christianity as a whole, reject moralism or self-helpism without really understanding the actual gospel message.

Why is this church here? To bring the gospel to both the needs of believers and unbelievers, for it is robust enough to provide rest for both types of sinners. On Sundays and in between.

No comments: