Friday, August 17, 2012

How many leaders you got? Now that's a better question

The other day I received a similar question to the ones mentioned in my previous post. The question, probably posed out of mere curiosity, provoked a little more thought than the standard: "how many you got" type questions. Instead of how many kids do you have, it was more like, "How many leaders do you have?"

That is a different type of question and one that deserves a little more positive dissecting.

One common thread I've noticed the past several years in books/articles I've read, seminars attended, ministry leaders I've talked with, and years of extensive personal experience/reflection is that the kids who walk with Jesus have several things in common. 

And having one dynamic youth leader really isn't tops on the list. But what seems to always be present is that the youth have had a number of adult relationships. Perhaps it looks like adults investing in their lives through a youth group, Sunday School, mentoring, or simply an "unstructured" but invested relationship involving hospitality, normal activities, or a retreat. 

One youth leader, and/or two parents are not enough. It's a great start, but kids need multiple adult relationships. By the way, I'm not de-emphasizing parent-child discipling relationship for that is primary; I'm merely emphasizing the responsibility of those in the covenant community. The principle "the more the merrier" could not be more apropos.

So here is the kicker: kids aren't going to naturally seek out adults. Adults have to seek them out. That may look like volunteering to teach Sunday School or youth group. That may look like filling in as a sub from time time. That may look like simply doing something very novel and creative: trying to talk with them on a Sunday morning. It may look like serving alongside of them as they rake leaves or participating in fantasy football with them. It may look like inviting them over to share a recipe or grab a latte. Regardless, if you are an adult male/female without a record who loves Jesus and currently has a pulse, you can play a part. Take that first step.
They actually do like adults. And they need adults. But they probably won't take that first step, and we probably shouldn't expect them to. 

When I prayed for the graduates last Sunday, I thanked God for the number of adults who were involved in their lives. I'm hopeful for these kids leaving school. For the most part, they are connected to other youth and adults.

I'm hopeful in a God who is faithful even when we as parents, youth leaders, or the rest of the church are faithless. But I'll take that as encouragement instead of a license to laziness. We often think of our kids in this way: "We ONLY have 18 years with them and so need to take advantage of this time." But for some reason I don't think we often view our covenant children with the same sense of urgency. Time is of the essence.

Thanks for all of you who have invested in not only your children, but the children of others. I hope you realize how important that time and relationship really are in the eyes of your Heavenly Father. Whatever the impact you notice or fail to notice (remember sometimes the impact isn't seen for years down the road, and sometimes there may not be the impact we desire), remember it isn't that type of "numbers game." And remember Henry Lyte's hymn Jesus I My Cross Have Taken, "Think what Spirit dwells within thee, think what Father's smiles are thine...." Those are the only smiles you need to motivate and remind you that you cannot fail.

1 comment:

pc said...

Great post. I totally agree. I've always said I need other adults in my children's lives that will reinforce the truths I've tried to teach them. Especially in those times when they don't want to listen to their parents. I do feel there is a need to keep that going through the college years also.
Well said.